PATHS – Wadden Sea

Connected to wind, clouds, sand and the sea

Whereas in the mountains exclusively red fabric strips were used to simulate units of measurement and mark and define artificial and artistic borderlines, at the WaddenSea additional objects like “Lugworm Poo” and “Network” were applied.

PATHS – Wadden Sea © Müller & Sohn, Amrum
Placement of the object Lugworm poo

Driven by curiosity, we went to the island of Amrum in April 2015, being for the first time equipped with the “lugworm poo” and “network”- objects. Further conspicuous items were two action cams, which we had mounted on bamboo sticks and yellowoilskins to protect us from wind and rain.

PATHS – Wadden Sea © Müller & Sohn, Amrum
Wooden paths lead through the dunes

The PATHS led us across wooden tracks, dunes, dykes and salt marshes. Then finally across the Kniepsand dune to the sea. 

Against the backdrop of the 15 km long and up to 1,5 km wide beach, we went our PATHS through the Wadden Sea. Holding the object “Network” above our heads, we were sailing close to the wind. At this point we let go any control as artists and yielded to the force of the elements. Nature itself took over direction to create,against this unique backdrop, images of stunning beauty that were captured by action cams.

PATHS – Wadden Sea © Müller & Sohn, Sylt
Hard on the wind

PATHS – Wadden Sea, Art and Science

The ongoing project PATHS – Wadden Sea brought us in 2017 to the Alfred- Wegner-Institute where we interviewed scientists about different aspects of the dynamic relationship between art and science. It was particularly interesting to discuss the inner drive that leads people to dedicating themselves to the either one or the other.